Expungement

Expungement

Legal Effect of an Expungement An expungement ordinarily means that an arrest or convictionis “sealed,” or erased from a person’s criminal record for most purposes. After the expungement process is complete, an arrest or a criminal conviction ordinarily does not need to be disclosed by the person who was arrested or convicted. For example, when…

Read More

Violent Crimes

Violent Crimes

The saying ‘An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth’ is one which we have probably all heard at one point in our lives. However, this saying can evoke strong emotion when considering the existence of conflict and violent crime in the world today. Violent crimes include crimes where intentional harm is inflicted…

Read More

Traffic Offenses

Traffic Offenses

There has been considerable media interest recently in whether or not the fines from the Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) have been legally issued, and therefore whether or not the driver is liable to pay the fine. The Automobile Association of South Africa (AA) provides clarity on what your rights are as a motorist. The…

Read More

Stalking

Stalking

What is Stalking? Stalking is the unwanted pursuit of another person, such as following a person, appearing at a person’s home or place of business, making harassing phone calls, leaving written messages or objects, or vandalising a person’s property. By its nature, stalking is not a one-time event. The individual’s actions must be considered in connection with…

Read More

Sex Crimes

Sex Crimes

A number of different offenses fall into the sex crimes category, but they generally involve illegal or coerced sexual conduct against another individual. Every state has laws against prohibiting the various types of sex crimes, such as rape and sexual assault, and each state has its own time limit (or “statute of limitations”) in which…

Read More

Murder

Murder

Murder is perhaps the single most serious criminal offence. Depending on the circumstances surrounding the killing, a person who is convicted of murder may be sentenced to many years in prison, a prison sentence with no possibility of Parole, or death. The precise definition of murder varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Under the Common Law, or law made by courts, murder was the unlawful killing of a human being with malice aforethought. The term malice aforethought did not necessarily mean that the killer planned or premeditated on the killing, or that he or she felt malice toward the victim. Generally, maliceafore thought referred to a level of intent or reck-lessness that separated murder from other killings and warranted stiffer punishment. The definition of murder has evolved over several centuries. Under most modern statutes in the United States, murder comes in four varieties: (1) intentional murder; (2) a killing that resulted from the intent to do serious bodily injury; (3) a killing that resulted from a depraved heart or extreme recklessness; and (4) murder committed by an Accomplice during the commission of, attempt of, or flight from certain felonies. Some jurisdictions still use the term malice aforethought to define intentional murder, but many have changed or elaborate don the term in order to describe more clearly a murderous state of mind. California has retained the malice after thought definition of murder (Cal. Penal Code § 187 [West 1996]). It also maintains a statute that defines the term malice. Under section 188 of the California Penal Code, malice is divided into two types: express and implied. Express malice exists“when there is manifested a deliberate intention unlawfully to take away the life of a fellow creature.” Malice may be implied by a judge or jury “when no considerable provocation appears, or when the circumstances attending the killing show an abandoned and malignant heart.”

Read More

Kidnapping

Kidnapping

The crime of unlawfully seizing and carrying away a person by force or Fraud, or seizing and detaining a person against his or her will with an intent to carry that person away at a later time. The law of kidnapping is difficult to define with precision because it varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Most state and federal kidnapping statutes define the term kidnapping vaguely, and courts fill in the details. Generally, kidnapping occurs when a person, without lawful authority, physically sports (i.e., moves) another person with out that other person’s consent, with the intent to use the abduction in connection with some other nefarious objective. Under the Model Penal Code (a set of exemplary criminal rules fashioned by the American Law Institute), kidnapping occurs when any person is unlawfully and non-con sensually a sported and held for certain purposes. These purposes include gaining ransom or reward; facilitating the commission of a felony or a flight after the commission of a felony; terrorising or inflicting bodily injury on the victim or a third person; and interfering with a governmental or political function (Model Penal Code §212.1). Kidnapping laws in the United States derive from the Common Law of kidnapping that was developed by courts in England.Originally, the crime of kidnapping was defined as the unlawful and non-consensual transportation of a person from one country to another. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, states began to redefine kidnapping, most notably eliminating the requirement of interstate transport. At the federal level, Congress passed the Lindbergh Act in 1932 to prohibit interstate kidnapping (48 Stat. 781 [codified At U.S.C.A. §§ 1201 et seq.]). The Lindbergh Act was named for Charles A. Lindbergh, a celebrated aviator and Air Force colonel whose baby was kidnapped and killed in 1932. The act provides that if a victim is not released within 24 hours after being abducted, a court may presume that the victim was transported across state lines. This presumption may be rebutted with evidence to the contrary. Other federal kidnapping statutes prohibit kidnapping in U.S. territories, kidnapping on the high seas and in the air, and kidnapping of government officials (18 U.S.C.A. §§ 1201 et seq., 1751 et seq.). A person who is convicted of kidnapping is usually sentenced to prison for a certain number of years. In some states, and at the federal level, the term of imprisonment may be the remainder of the offender’s natural life. In jurisdictions that authorise the death penalty, a kidnapper is charged with a capital offence if the kidnapping results in death. Kidnapping is so severely punished because it is a dreaded offence. It usually occurs in connection with another criminal offence, or underlying crime. It involves violent deprivation of liberty, and it requires a special criminal boldness. Furthermore, the act of moving a crime victim exposes the victim to risks above and beyond those that are inherent in the underlying crime. Most kidnapping statutes recognise different types and levels of kidnapping and assign punishment accordingly. New York State, for example, bases its definition of first-degree kidnapping on the purpose and length of the abduction. First-degree kidnapping occurs when a person abducts another person to obtain ransom (N.Y. Penal Code § 135.25 [McKinney 1996]).First-degree kidnapping also occurs when the abduction lasts for more than 12 hours and the abductor intends to injure the victim; to accomplish or advance the commission of a felony; to terrorise the victim or a third person; or to interfere with governmental or political function. An abduction that results in death is also first-degree kidnapping. A first-degree kidnapping in New York State is a class A-1 felony, which carries a sentence of at least 20 years in prison (§ 70.00). New York State also has a second-degree kidnapping statute. A person is guilty of second-degree kidnapping if he or she abducts another person (§ 135.20). This crime lacks the aggravating circumstances in first-degree kidnapping, and it is ranked as a class B felony. A person who is convicted of a class B felony in New York State can be sentenced to one to eight years in prison (§ 70.00). Two key elements are common to all charges of kidnapping. First, the a transportation or-detention must be unlawful. Under various state and federal statutes, not all seizures and a transportation constitute kidnapping: Police officers may arrest and jail person they suspect of a crime, and parents are allowed to reasonably restrict and control the movement of their children.

Read More

Dwi

Dwi

An abbreviation for driving while intoxicated, which is an offence committed by an individual who operates a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or Drugs and Narcotics. An abbreviation for died without issue, which commonly appears in genealogical tables. A showing of complete intoxication is not necessary for a charge of driving while intoxicated. State laws indicate levels alcoholically content at which an individual is deemed to be under the influence of alcohol. Laws against drunk driving vary slightly from state to state. In the majority of states, a person’s first DWI charge (also-referred to as Driving under the Influence, or DUI, in some states) results in an automatic suspension of the violator’s license. The length of the suspension in the various states ranges from 45 days to one year. Forty-three states require offenders to install ignition interlocks on their vehicles in order to drive. These devices are capable of analysing a driver’s breath, and the ignition is unlocked only if the driver has not been drinking. In 29 states, violators may be required to forfeit-their vehicles that they have driven while impaired. States have made efforts to strengthen their drunk driving laws since the 1980s. They have imposed longer prison sentences, and many have turned DWI into a felony-level crime for repeat offenders. However, the more controversial issue in this national debate has been the effort to reduce the blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) that is needed to charge a person with DWI, from .10 percent to .08 percent. Proponents have argued that such a reduction is the most effective way to prevent drunk-driving deaths. Opponents contend that the .08 percent standard is too low and that it will ensnare drivers whore not truly impaired. Although many states had adopted the .08 percent standard, proponents sought a national solution, winning a victory in October 2000, when Congress enacted, and then-President William Jefferson Clinton signed, the Transportation Appropriation Bill. Included in the act was a provision that requires states to enact a .08 percent BAC as the legal limit or lose part of their federal highway funding. Since this enactment, 36 states and the District of Columbia have reduced their BAC standard to .08 percent, while the others have maintained a .10 percent standard. Evidence suggests a strong correlation between a BAC greater than .05 percent and risk of serious injury or death while operating a motor vehicle. After a person’s BAC reaches .08 percent or more, the probability of a crash climbs rapidly. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) estimated that in 1998, alcohol played a part in 39 percent of all fatal crashes and seven percent of all traffic accidents. NHTSA also predicted that three out of ten Americans will be involved in an alcohol-related crash at some time during their lives. The Clinton administration supported a national approach to establishing a drunk-driving standard but met congressional resistance. The .08 percent BAC law passed in the Senate in 1998, but it failed to pass in the House of Representatives. As a compromise, Congress provided $500 million of incentive grants over six years to states that have enacted, and that are enforcing, a .08 BAC law. Congress agreed to adopt the .08 limit only after adjusting the timing and severity of penalties for states that refuse to lower their legal limits. States that refuse to lower their limits by October 1, 2003 will lose two percent of their federal highway construction funding. This percentage will increase to four percent in 2004, six percent in 2005, and eight percent in 2006. If states lose funding in 2003, they will have four years to pass the .08 BAC standard. If they do so,the money withheld will be returned to them.

Read More

Drug Crimes

Drug Crimes

Drugs are related to crime in multiple ways. Most directly, it is a crime to use, possess, manufacture, or distribute drugs classified as having a potential for abuse. Cocaine, heroin, marijuana, and amphetamines are examples of drugs classified to have abuse potential. Drugs are also related to crime through the effects they have on the…

Read More

Domestic Violence

Domestic Violence

Whether domestic violence is a crime depends on the particular circumstances, as well as the laws of the state in which the act or acts occur. Often domestic violence is both a crime subject to criminal punishment and a civil wrong subject to restraint upon personal conduct and an award of a money damages in…

Read More